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Quote Paraphrase Summarize

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 5 months ago

COMMENTING - You are invited to comment on the contents of this page using the Comments link located above.

 

Student Resources > Avoiding Plagiarism > How to Quote, Paraphrase and Summarize

 

 

 
 

How to Quote, Paraphrase and Summarize

   

The best way to avoid plagiarism is to know how to incorporate the words and ideas of other's into your work.  This page provides commentary and links to resources that explain and teach how to properly quote, paraphrase and summarize the words and ideas of others.

 

 


Resources


 

Ranked Choices (in order of relevance)

 

Developed by Mike Palmquist, Professor of English and University Distinguished Teaching Scholar at Colorado State University, author of The Bedford Researcher and developer of the acclaimed online writing studio writing@csu, This tutorial walks the user through how to integrate sources through direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries.  Each section includes examples from student writing, but there are no interactive elements in this tutorial.

 

Purdue's OWL (Online Writing Lab) was one of the first such online services and remains one of the most respected.

 

There are three parts to this tutorial.  The first part is a multiple-choice exercise that tests your understanding of plagiarism through situational examples.  The second part is a streamed PowerPoint presentation with audio that defines plagiarism and copyright and then discusses how to paraphrase and properly cite the words and ideas of others.  The final part is an exercise in paraphrasing and summarizing.

 

 

More Choices: Quotations (in alphabetical order)

 

This is the online tutorial from the companion web site of The Bedford Researcher by Mike Palmquist, Professor of English and University Distinquished Teaching Scholar at Colorado State University and developer of the acclaimed online writing studio writing@csu.  Of particular note is  Chapter 13: How Do I Integrate a Quotation into my Draft?  Chapter 13 goes over integrating direct quotations into a sentence or paragraph with ample practice every step of the way.

 

  • Quotations  [E-HANDOUT]

    The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/quotations.html

     

    This handout explains when one should quote, how to set up a direct quotation, how much to quote,  and how to use quotation marks. 

 

 

 

More Choices: Paraphrasing (in alphabetical order)

 

 

This is the online tutorial from the companion web site of The Bedford Researcher by Mike Palmquist, Professor of English and University Distinguished Teaching Scholar at Colorado State University and developer of the acclaimed online writing studio writing@csu.  Of particular note is Chapter 10: How Do I Paraphrase a Source? Chapter 10 gives students a step-by-step approach to  paraphrasing sources with ample practice every step of the way. 

 

This tutorial primarily addresses the difference between plagiarism and paraphrasing with true-life scenarios on the impact of plagiarism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (5)

Anonymous said

at 10:37 am on Apr 15, 2007

This pages doesn't have an opening section that explains quoting and paraphrasing. Is it needed?

Anonymous said

at 12:38 pm on May 6, 2007

On quoting, paraphrasing, I again am wanting to see the Bedford material made an official part of the GW website. If it's problemmatic to move it into the main text, could a sentence in the main body of the text say that it is Required reading (e.g., "Please read...for great guidance in this area" and then something that identifies the Bedford material as KEY Reading or the like? What I'm looking for is a way to identify clearly that a small amount of the linked material is considered a fundamental part of the GW web program, not just a resource among many, and will "be on the test."

Anonymous said

at 1:22 pm on May 6, 2007

Why is the Bedford material listed twice, the 2nd time under More Resources?

Anonymous said

at 8:50 pm on May 10, 2007

Paraphrasing is probably the most difficult concept to explain to students and have them understand. They simply should not do it, and should rephrase (and still cite) or use a direct (but not overly long) quote and cite it. We probably need to do even more to show why a writer should never paraphrase.

Anonymous said

at 8:53 pm on May 10, 2007

I need to clarify what I just said. I think the problem is the word "paraphrase", as opposed to "rephrase" or "restate in your own words". Students see "paraphrasing" as just changing a few words here and there, as if that were sufficient, and then citing the source or not. I get lots of questions about this from faculty all over the university, who see this problem in student writing.

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